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The future of a society is intimately bound up with and to a great extent dependent upon the way the youth are prepared for the task of maintaining that society


The society which scorns excellence in plumbing as a humble activity and tolerates shoddiness in philosophy because it is an exalted activity will have neither good plumbing nor good philosophy: neither its pipes nor its theories will hold water.- John W. Gardner

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Local file
 
wfcwCollege launches month-long programme to tackle gang and youth violence
26 May 2018
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Waltham Forest College will hold a series of workshops over a four-week period to raise awareness about gang and youth violence.It has teamed up with Safer London and Sparks4Life to deliver the programme which will give youngsters tips on how to stay safe and avoid confrontation.
The college in Walthamstow’s Forest Road said it decided to hold the workshops in response to the increased level of violence across London.
Topics such as managing conflict, online safety, healthy relationships, consent and safety planning will be covered.
wfcwCollege becomes corporate partner of Society for Education and Training
9 December 2018
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Waltham Forest College is the latest further education provider to be made a corporate partner of the Society for Education and Training (SET).
The agreement will see over 200 teaching staff become members of SET, the only professional membership body dedicated to teachers and trainers working in further education.
Principal Dr Joy Kettyle said: “This partnership will allow the college to be recognised as a corporate partner.
“By championing the quality of teaching and training, the professional development will allow our teaching staff to be further inspired by having access to high-quality teaching, learning and assessment resources and move us towards our journey to outstanding.”
 
wfcwGovernment pulls all Learndirect contracts and funding
15 August 2017
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A leading thinktank said the alleged mismanagement at Learndirect was symptomatic of the systemic failure of public policy.
Move comes after privatised adult training agency accused of paying owners millions despite ‘catastrophic’ decline in standards
The government is to cancel all contracts with Learndirect, the adult training provider that tried to suppress a damning regulator’s report into its poor standards.
The Department for Education said on Tuesday that it would withdraw all funding from the organisation, which is responsible for almost 73,000 trainees, by July 2018 and that it had already banned it from taking on new apprentices.
 
TopBritain rewarded with technical training, after leaving Europe
wfcwBudget 2017: Major technical education reforms will make vocational qualifications ‘equal’ to A Levels
5 March 2017
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The plans involve streamlining an estimated 13,000 technical qualifications down to just 15, and take a major step towards closing the startling “productivity gap” between the UK and many other leading developed nations, which the Chancellor Philip Hammond has warned is the “only sustainable way” to improve living standards.
The UK’s technical education system is weak by international standards. Only 10 per cent of 20 to 45-year-olds hold technical education as their highest qualification.
Among the recommendations are increasing the amount of training for 16 to 19-year-olds on technical routes.
wfcwLondon Borough of Waltham Forest, Local Economic Assessment
November 2010, Navigant Consulting
.. read full report
A low-skilled borough... Skills levels in Waltham Forest are very low, as in most of East London. Waltham Forest ranks 377th out of 408 local areas in Great Britain on overall skills and qualifications scores.There are more Asian/Asian British unemployed in Waltham Forest than any other ethnic grouping. Asian/Asian British residents are nearly three times as likely to be unemployed as White residents, and twice as likely as Black/Black British residents.
wfcwWaltham Forest College opens £4m STEM centre to 'help create workforce of the future'
14th December 2017
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Students and staff welcomed a Deputy Mayor of London to their college this week to cut the ribbon of a multi-million pound centre for science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).
Jules Pipe, Deputy Mayor for Planning, Regeneration and Skills, officially opened the building in Waltham Forest College at a launch event attended by local employers, education providers and stakeholders on Tuesday.
The £4 million state-of-the-art development at the site in Forest Road, Walthamstow which boasts industry standard workshops and a science lab.
Mr Pipe, said: “I’m really encouraged by Waltham Forest College’s ambition and vision to equip more Londoners with the STEM skills this city so desperately needs.
“The Mayor and I are determined to do all we can to enable all Londoners, whatever their background, to share in the capital’s prosperity and fulfil their potential – and I look forward to continuing to work with the College to help create the workforce of the future.”
Teachers will focus on skills development for STEM employment in fields such as nursing, midwifery, Motor Vehicle Engineering, railway engineering and technical textiles.
The project was made possible by funding from the Greater London Authority (GLA).
Principal Penny Wycherley said the workshops would ensure students have a “tremendous opportunity” to acquire the skills employers are looking for.“Waltham Forest College serves one of the most deprived and diverse communities in the country,” she said.
wfcwLEYTONSTONE: Construction training centre finally opens
12th December 2010
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 NEW £7million Construction Training Centre, which was supposed to help students get jobs on the Olympic site, has finally opened in Leytonstone.
It is being run by the National Construction College and aims to help provide skills to thousands of residents in the borough.
The centre, in Cathall Road, was criticised earlier this year as a "missed opportunity" after a six-month delay to the project meant there would not be enough time for it to help train local people to work on the 2012 Games site.
But the council denied the claims and said it was never meant to just provide construction workers for the Olympic venues.
The centre was opened earlier this week by local politicians including council leader Cllr Chris Robbins and Leyton and Wanstead MP John Cryer.
WFGuardianCouncil has admitted long-term failings to help unemployed in Waltham Forest.
17th January 2013
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Organisations contracted to deliver the scheme often blamed the council for failing to provide adequate support. Despite a large investment over a number of years Worknet has repeatedly failed to meet targets, often helping only a fraction of the people it was supposed to.
wfcwUnemployed 'let down by Olympic legacy training centre'
1st March 2013
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A multi-million pound construction training centre hailed as an Olympic legacy for Waltham Forest has delivered just a fraction of the promised number of apprenticeships for local people.
Figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act also suggest that the majority of such trainees at the Cathall Road National Skills Academy in Leytonstone are not even from Waltham Forest.
When the £7.24million centre opened late in 2010, Waltham Forest Council claimed that it would provide 160 annual apprenticeships and give training for 1,000 unemployed local people every year.
But it has now emerged that just 105 apprentices studied at the centre between 2010 and 2012.
Olympic legacy training centre''Economy to blame' for poor performance of construction training centre in Leytonstone
5th March 2013
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The poor performance of a construction training centre hailed as an Olympic legacy for Waltham Forest has been blamed on the economic downturn by the council.
Last week it was revealed that the Cathall Road National Skills Academy in Leytonstone has failed to provide the promised number of annual apprenticeships for local people.
The authority has been unable to provide figures for how many of the total trainees are from Waltham Forest, but said only 19 per cent of apprentices and funded learners were from the borough.
In a statement to the Guardian, the council's cabinet member for economic development, Cllr Mark Rusling, admitted the apprenticeship figure was "disappointing" but said he was confident people would benefit from the centre in future.
wfcwTheresa May announces new technical training drive to prepare country for Brexit
21 January 2017
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Theresa May will announce a drive to create a specialist maths school in every British city on Monday to ensure the country “stands tall in the world” after Brexit.
A £170 million package to establish “Institutes of Technology” will also be announced in the government’s long-awaited industrial strategy.  
It seeks to address Britain’s low productivity compared to other developed countries, something which Philip Hammond, the Chancellor, has prioritised.
Previewing the announcements, Mrs May said: “Our modern industrial strategy is a critical part of our plan for post-Brexit Britain.
wfcwWaltham Forest College opens £4m STEM centre to 'help create workforce of the future'
14th December 2017
read …
Students and staff welcomed a Deputy Mayor of London to their college this week to cut the ribbon of a multi-million pound centre for science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).
Jules Pipe, Deputy Mayor for Planning, Regeneration and Skills, officially opened the building in Waltham Forest College at a launch event attended by local employers, education providers and stakeholders on Tuesday.
The £4 million state-of-the-art development at the site in Forest Road, Walthamstow which boasts industry standard workshops and a science lab.
Mr Pipe, said: “I’m really encouraged by Waltham Forest College’s ambition and vision to equip more Londoners with the STEM skills this city so desperately needs.
“The Mayor and I are determined to do all we can to enable all Londoners, whatever their background, to share in the capital’s prosperity and fulfil their potential – and I look forward to continuing to work with the College to help create the workforce of the future.”
Teachers will focus on skills development for STEM employment in fields such as nursing, midwifery, Motor Vehicle Engineering, railway engineering and technical textiles.
The project was made possible by funding from the Greater London Authority (GLA).
Principal Penny Wycherley said the workshops would ensure students have a “tremendous opportunity” to acquire the skills employers are looking for.“Waltham Forest College serves one of the most deprived and diverse communities in the country,” she said.

wfcwUK recovery 'constrained' by lack of engineers
4 November 2013
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Government adviser, Prof Perkins: "We should support the UK's young people by preparing them to compete for highly paid, skilled engineering jobs, improving their career prospects and reducing the need to import engineering skills"

Olympic legacy training centre'Unemployed 'let down by Olympic legacy training centre'
1st March 2013
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A multi-million pound construction training centre hailed as an Olympic legacy for Waltham Forest has delivered just a fraction of the promised number of apprenticeships for local people.
Figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act also suggest that the majority of such trainees at the Cathall Road National Skills Academy in Leytonstone are not even from Waltham Forest.
When the £7.24million centre opened late in 2010, Waltham Forest Council claimed that it would provide 160 annual apprenticeships and give training for 1,000 unemployed local people every year.
But it has now emerged that just 105 apprentices studied at the centre between 2010 and 2012.
And there were only 91 apprentices and funded learners living in postcodes entirely or partly in Waltham Forest during that time - 19 per cent of the total.
It comes just months after a council panel was set up to investigate failures of the authority's unemployment programme Worknet, which also failed to hit its targets.
Part of Worknet included a partnership with the National Construction College organisation, which was awarded the contract to run the centre by the council.
wfcw ‘Our Olympics': (3) The National Construction College’s Cathall Rd. facility
Nick Tiratsoo
April 10, 2015
read ...
The National Construction College’s facility in Cathall Rd., on the Leyton-Leytonstone border, was presented by LBWF as the jewel in the crown of Waltham Forest’s Olympic legacy. Looking like a super IKEA, looming over the surrounding buildings, and hyped by every Labour hack from Cathall Councillor Terry Wheeler to the Leader himself, here was something, the patter ran, that was really going to impact on local people’s lives, and in particular dramatically diminish worklessness.
Today, the Construction Academy is virtually forgotten, and the rumour is that it will soon close. Locals hope that it becomes a real IKEA, but the likelihood is that it will be replaced by boxy flats.
- UPDATE
WFGuardianCouncil has admitted long-term failings to help unemployed in Waltham Forest.
17th January 2013
read ...
Organisations contracted to deliver the scheme often blamed the council for failing to provide adequate support. Despite a large investment over a number of years Worknet has repeatedly failed to meet targets, often helping only a fraction of the people it was supposed to.
TopHiding in plain sight
wfcwDavid Lammy: A new approach to adult education will help Londoners succeed
12 January 2017
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Why is the political class so obsessed with 18-year-olds going to university? Is it because they assume that what worked for them will work for everybody else? Bring back night schools — learning isn’t one-size-fits-all and it certainly doesn’t end at 18 or 21.
I remember a time when Londoners could do part-time courses in the evening to gain new skills that would let them move into a better job and build a better life for their family. Floodlight, a Yellow Pages for adult education, was available at every newsagents. New York puts us to shame when it comes to lifelong learning — anyone travelling on the subway passes walls plastered with adverts for evening classes alongside the salaries commanded by each profession.
Too many Londoners are trapped in low-paid work with no real prospects of moving into more fulfilling and better-paid work. What opportunities are there for those working in call centres, or on zero-hours contracts in retail or hospitality, to learn new skills if they missed out as teenagers?
wfcwEducation in England: Annual Report 2016
Key findings
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Over 60 per cent of secondary and over 40 per cent of primary pupils are still failing to achieve a world-class benchmark.
As a result of the new, more challenging, GCSE examinations in 2017, we expect the number of pupils achieving a ‘good pass’ in English and Maths to drop very significantly.
Download report
- pdf
wfcwWhite British pupils are being overtaken at school because of a lack of parental support
April 2016
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White British pupils are falling behind students from other ethnic backgrounds by the time they reach their GCSEs because of a lack of support from their parents, according to a report.
The research, by the CentreForum think tank, suggests white British children are among the top three highest achievers at the age of five.
But by the age of 16, the group's performance slips to 13th in a table behind those of Chinese, Indian, Asian and black African heritage.
CentreForum

studentsPupils with English as second language 'outperform' white British at GCSE
4 April 2016
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Pupils who speak English as a second language are outperforming native speakers in core GCSE subjects as white British students fall behind 10 other ethnic groups, new research showed.
White British pupils are lagging behind because other ethnic groups are receiving more help from their families.
The new study shows white British pupils lagging behind ten other ethnic groups when judged against new benchmarks based on eight subjects to promote a broad and balanced curriculum at the end of secondary school.
Tony Blair, 1994
"Ask me my three main priorities for government and I tell you education, education, and education." Tony Blair's rallying cries in bringing New Labour to power were promises to transform public services.
Reformers versus wreckers.
That is the battle for this Parliament and it is one that we must win.
3 February 2002, Labour spring conference speech
Tony Blair: Don't blame migrants for taking your job
13 March 2016
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Former PM tells unemployed British workers they should get a better education to keep up
Tony Blair has told unemployed British workers "not to blame migrants for having taken your job" claiming they should get a better education to "allow them to operate in the modern world" instead.
The former Labour Prime Minister also warned that a lot of the anger surrounding the migration debate is "prejudice" and an easy response to stagnating wages in the UK.
Mr Blair has been heavily criticised for his decision not to impose transitional controls on migrants arriving from Bulgaria and Romania, who have been blamed for pushing down wages in the UK.
wfcwBritain’s economic and jobs performance is better than much of the rest of Europe’s. But at the bottom of the heap too many lag far behind
Aug 22nd 2015
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Britain has the third-highest share of youngsters with poor literacy and numeracy skills, and the fourth-highest share who are bad with technology. And British NEETS are the most illiterate and innumerate. 
Britain has one of Europe’s most flexible labour markets, which creates lots of jobs for the relatively unskilled. But this may exacerbate differences between those who are employed and those who are not. In 2012 the literacy gap between young Britons in employment and those out of work was the highest in the OECD
   
TopLearners and employers rating skills training
wfcwEmployers to play bigger role in rating skills training
28 April 2014
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Ofsted is asking employers in England to rate the effectiveness of skills training and education providers.
The aim is to "increase employers' engagement in education and training", said Lorna Fitzjohn, of Ofsted.
Employers are asked to rate short in-service training courses in a specific skill, apprenticeships and longer more general courses that give students a grounding in a particular profession or trade before they start work.
wfcwOfsted Learner View  
Learner View gives you the chance to tell us what you think about your further education and skills provider
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wfcwOfsted Employer View
Where employers can rate further education and skills providers
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wfcwNewham Ofsted student reports
on their experience of education and training
learnerview.ofsted.gov.uk/
wfcwWaltham Forest Ofsted student reports
on their experience of education and training
learnerview.ofsted.gov.uk/
   
TopTechnical training and apprenticeships
wfcwState schools must drop 'outdated snobbery' against apprenticeships
24 January 2016
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New legislation will ensure technical colleges and companies providing apprenticeships give careers advice in schools
A new law ensuring that state schools promote apprenticeships as much as university education will be introduced this year in a bid to end the “outdated snobbery” against technical education.
Nicky Morgan, the Secretary of State for Education will legislate to ensure that technical colleges and companies providing apprenticeships get into schools to give careers advice to pupils.
   
TopWaltham Forest Construction and Skills Training
wfcw'Learn English' Councils should teach people rather than use translators, blasts Pickles
19 January 2015
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Eric Pickles, the Communities Secretary:  Councils should spend money on teaching people to learn English rather than translating documents into different languages.
He claimed translation services segregate the population.
wfcwSkills Funding Agency withdraws English language funding for speakers of other languages
31 July 2015
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The sector was left reeling last week after the Skills Funding Agency (SFA) announced the complete withdrawal of funding for Esol Plus Mandation courses (English for speakers of other languages).
The £45 million programme is targeted at Jobseeker’s Allowance claimants identified as having poor spoken English skills, as this prevents them from being able to find work.
nutshellMore on Language, skills training and society
wfcwSecond TfL spelling blunder spotted
10 August 2015
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ANOTHER spelling blunder by Transport for London has been spotted in E17, just days after the organisation misspelt Walthamstow.
wfcwSixth form colleges government cuts
11 August 2015
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Survey on England’s 93 colleges shows class sizes rising, courses being dropped and seven out of 10 principals worried of inability to provide a quality education.  
Reigate college principal Steve Oxlade ‘My guess is that by 2020 no more than 10 sixth form colleges will be financially viable unless they take drastic action now.’
wfcwLeader Chris Robbins promises to face cuts head on and not hide away from austerity
23 July 2015
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A council leader has promised to tackle "head on" and has warned there will be further cutbacks to come in Waltham Forest.
Leader of the council Chris Robbins gave a frank speech, promising not to hide away from austerity. "The need for difficult decisions will increase as time goes by, they will get worse and the sorry situation we're confronted with tonight, will continue because it gets harder and harder to implement the reductions."   
Councillor Mark Rusling, responsible for children and young people, said: "Because of the scale of the cuts over the last four or five years, we are down to statutory children's services only. 
wfcw British Chambers of Commerce
2 April 2014
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Britain told to prepare for 'real austerity'
John Longworth, director-general of the BCC accused the political class of failing young people, in a scathing attack on the education system which has ‘wasted human capital’.:  Britain needs politicians ‘to be more economically literate and business orientated’.
Education, education, education' – what a meaningless phrase this proved to be, he said.
Accusing some schools, colleges and universities of ‘losing the plot’, Longworth said: ‘Preparing this generation for the British workforce is too important to the economy for us to ignore.’.
wfcwCllr Alan Siggers, Conservative party:
You still publish Waltham Forest News, which is £500,000 a year and is actually illegal.
>> more on Training <<  

 
wfcwWhy can't Britain build enough homes to meet demand?
11 August 2015
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The UK is in the grip of a housing crisis. In London in particular, entire developments containing hundreds of flats are often sold before construction has even begun.
The failure to build enough homes means that millions of people are stuck renting when they would rather be living in a home they own.
The housing charity Shelter says the shortage is "enormously damaging, socially as well as economically" and is forcing a quarter of those aged under 35 to stay living with their parents.
Just 125,110 homes were built in England in the year to March, according to government figures. That is about half as many needed to keep up with demand, and the problem is compounded every year.
Why can't Britain build enough homes to meet demand?
wfcw ‘Our Olympics': (3) The National Construction College’s Cathall Rd. facility
Nick Tiratsoo
April 10, 2015
read ...
The National Construction College’s facility in Cathall Rd., on the Leyton-Leytonstone border, was presented by LBWF as the jewel in the crown of Waltham Forest’s Olympic legacy. Looking like a super IKEA, looming over the surrounding buildings, and hyped by every Labour hack from Cathall Councillor Terry Wheeler to the Leader himself, here was something, the patter ran, that was really going to impact on local people’s lives, and in particular dramatically diminish worklessness.
Today, the Construction Academy is virtually forgotten, and the rumour is that it will soon close. Locals hope that it becomes a real IKEA, but the likelihood is that it will be replaced by boxy flats.
-
UPDATE
>> more on Construction Skills <<  
 
TopPoor being cast aside - consequences for society and a skilled workforce
wfcwFury as bishops say cuts mean poor are cast aside
16 January 2015
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The Archbishops of Canterbury and York said Britain is caught in a 'cycle of decline'
Archbishops of Canterbury and York said that the Government was 'casting aside' the poor.  As a result, they said, Britain had become dominated by 'rampant' individualism, is 'ill at ease with itself' and was in many places 'trapped in apparently inevitable decline'.
The comments were made by the Archbishops of Canterbury and York in a campaigning book to be published next week. The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend Justin Welby, and the Most Reverend Dr John Sentamu, put their names to a series of essays.
Their book, On Rock or Sand?, declared that many are 'left behind' by 'rampant consumerism' and individualism.
Last night David Cameron said he 'profoundly disagreed' with the two archbishops. And angry MPs said their comments were simply inaccurate and accused the primates of straying too far into the political arena.
wfcwSkills Funding Agency withdraws English language funding for speakers of other languages
31 July 2015
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Colleges will be forced to continue offering language courses for thousands of unemployed learners, despite millions of pounds’ worth of funding being cut, TES can reveal.
The sector was left reeling last week after the Skills Funding Agency (SFA) announced the complete withdrawal of funding for Esol Plus Mandation courses (English for speakers of other languages).
The £45 million programme is targeted at Jobseeker’s Allowance claimants identified as having poor spoken English skills, as this prevents them from being able to find work.
With the adult skills budget for 2015-16 already cut by 11 per cent, and a further 3.9 per cent reduction announced in a letter from the SFA last week, colleges told TES that they would be unable to meet the demand.
Several principals warned that widespread job losses across the sector would be “inevitable”, with vulnerable, ethnic minority learners likely to be hardest hit by the changes.
wfcw Skilled workers 'may vanish' if further education budget cuts continue
24 June 2015
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Labour market expert Professor Alison Wolf says cuts to FE colleges and growth of universities could see UK lose valuable source of technicians and mechanics
Britain’s supply of skilled workers may “vanish into history” if looming budget cuts in further education and the unchecked expansion of universities are allowed to continue, according to the architect of the government’s vocational education plans.
Professor Alison Wolf, a respected labour market expert and author of the Wolf review of vocational education, said the further education sector that provides the bulk of the UK’s post-secondary training faces possible collapse.
Review of vocational education:- 26 Sep 14
wfcwThere is a lack of political leadership in relation to maltreated children and vulnerable children in this country
3 July 2015
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Camila Batmanghelidjh, Kids Company said: ‘Our political leaders can’t bear to face the truth’
One of Britain’s most high-profile children’s campaigners, Camila Batmanghelidjh, has launched a blistering attack on politicians and austerity, as she announced she is to step down after nearly 20 years at the head of the Kids Company charity.She says: ‘I am being silenced’ over cuts in government funding for her charity that would leave traumatised children ‘largely unprotected’
wfcwKids Company: Camila Batmanghelidjh's charity to close amid financial concerns
5 August 2015
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Kids Company, the London youth work charity, is said to have told ministers it will be shutting its services on Wednesday evening in the light of new concerns about its financial management.
The charity, set up in 1996 by Camila Batmanghelidjh, recently received a £3m rescue package from the government.


 
wfcw ‘Our Olympics': (3) The National Construction College’s Cathall Rd. facility
Nick Tiratsoo
April 10, 2015
read ...
The National Construction College’s facility in Cathall Rd., on the Leyton-Leytonstone border, was presented by LBWF as the jewel in the crown of Waltham Forest’s Olympic legacy. Looking like a super IKEA, looming over the surrounding buildings, and hyped by every Labour hack from Cathall Councillor Terry Wheeler to the Leader himself, here was something, the patter ran, that was really going to impact on local people’s lives, and in particular dramatically diminish worklessness.
Today, the Construction Academy is virtually forgotten, and the rumour is that it will soon close. Locals hope that it becomes a real IKEA, but the likelihood is that it will be replaced by boxy flats.
Update - Worknet debacle
The National Construction College, Cathall Rd: local people still miss out

read ...
Between January 2013 and May 2015, 5,088 people attended all the College’s myriad training courses, but only 268 or 5 per cent were Waltham Forest residents.
In the same period, there were 1598 apprentices trained in total, but only 41 or 2.5 per cent were Waltham Forest residents.
Waltham Forest College
wfcwWaltham Forest College and Barnet and Southgate College appoint principal to oversee transition as they merge into one 
9 December 2016
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Waltham Forest College in Forest Road, Walthamstow, could join with Barnet and Southgate College in Wood Street, Barnet.
David Byrne has been the principal and chief executive officer of Barnet and Southgate College since 2012 will oversee the merging of Waltham Forest College with Barnet and Southgate College
Principal of Waltham Forest College, Penny Wycherley, said: “I am committed to working closely with David to make this merger a success.”
One of David Byrne’s early tasks will be to lead the public consultation on the proposed merger, gathering views from the communities.
Mr Byrne said: “The merger will help us extend our training offer and deliver more high quality courses that meet the needs of the young people and businesses we serve. “We also want to strengthen our ties with other neighbouring colleges as we go forwards.”
wfcwBarnet and Southgate College is set to merge with Waltham Forest College
2 February 2017
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Barnet and Southgate College is set to merge with Waltham Forest College in plans laid out in a new consultation document released yesterday (Wednesday, February 2).
All members of the public and stakeholders have been encouraged to comment on the proposals, with the consultation due to close on March 1.
It is hoped the merger will provide a wider base of resources for both colleges, allowing students access to a wider variety of specialist subjects in their further education.
Chair of Barnet and Southgate College Ann Zinkin said: “This is a strategic merger of equals, driven by the needs of the learners and the industries and communities we serve. “Our ambition is to create a new and vibrant college better able to meet the economic and social challenges that London, our local boroughs and the wider country face.  “This merger will create better opportunities for our learners, providing higher levels of resource and sustainable investment so that the best possible experience is offered to all our stakeholders.”
Current principal for Barnet and Southgate College has been designated as the principal of the resultant merged college.
wfcwWaltham Forest College financial director Debbie Greenidge stepped down after £2 million pound budget deficit.
31st January 2014
The college missed out on further funding as a result. The minutes of a November meeting show The University and College Union had announced the intention of staff to put forward a vote of no confidence in the management team. Principal Robin Jones admitted the college had experienced long-term financial problems.
Waltham Forest College Corporation Members

wfcwPenny Wycherley is now the principal of Waltham Forest College
10 March 2015 
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College principal and former Ofsted inspector has come out of retirement to boost success rates at Waltham Forest College
wfcwWaltham Forest College Principal Robin Jones is to stand down following criticism from watchdog Ofsted.
28 November 2014
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Inspectors found Waltham Forest College, in Forest Road, Walthamstow, which has faced financial difficulties in recent years, required improvement following a visit in October.
Lead inspector Richard Moore said too few students fail to complete their courses successfully, with results especially poor in health and social care, construction, hairdressing, beauty therapy and visual arts.
He also highlighted poor student behaviour in English and Maths lessons.
The college, which has a student population of 7,000 and is the biggest in the borough, was praised for the performance of adult learners and relationships with employers.
Principal Robin Jones told staff this week that he is to retire today.
Nutshell£2 million pound budget deficit and a vote of no confidence in management
31st January 2014
College must sort out its finances by 2014/15
A college has been thrown into turmoil after posting a financial deficit of £2million having previously faced a staff revolt.
Waltham Forest College financial director Debbie Greenidge stepped down last year before the shortfall was made public.
Minutes of a meeting between bosses show £700,000 was lost when the college lost its Highly Trusted Sponsor status (HTS), which meant it was temporarily barred from taking foreign students.
The reason for the loss of status has yet to be revealed, but the college missed out on further funding as a result.
The minutes of the meeting in November also show The University and College Union had announced the intention of staff to put forward a vote of no confidence in the management team.
The UCU and college are yet to reveal the nature of the concerns raised.
Principal Robin Jones admitted the college had experienced long-term financial problems.
“We are experiencing and have been for the last two to three years a substantial income shortfall,” he said.
A plan has been put in place to balance the books by the end of the next financial year, which includes a review of staffing.
Peter Doble has been brought in as a ‘financial advisor’ following Ms Greenidge’s departure, which Mr Jones said was for personal reasons.

 
wfcwTechnical colleges flop as they fail to recruit pupils
October 18 2016
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University Technical Colleges were intended to be part of the expansion of the vocational sector that would offset criticism of Theresa May’s grammar schools policy
Pioneering schools set up to improve technical education are facing closure because they cannot recruit enough students.
Around 10 per cent of all the new university technical colleges (UTCs) for 14-18 year olds have either shut their doors or announced plans to close, despite the first opening only six years ago.
The closures are a blow to government plans to expand the vocational sector and offset criticisms of Theresa May’s grammar schools policy.
“No one doubts that they are the right idea in principle but some have been struggling to fit into the existing system because they only recruit at…
tesFlagship University Technical College to close due to falling pupil numbers
11-7-2014
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Hackney UTC in east London has said it will be close just two years after it first opened after receiving only 29 applications for September out of a target of 75. It follows a critical Ofsted report in February which said the college was underperforming in a number of areas.
Hackney UTC in east London has said it will be close just two years after it first opened after receiving only 29 applications for September out of a target of 75. It follows a critical Ofsted report in February which said the college was underperforming in a number of areas. The college will close in August 2015.
A spokesman for the Department for Education told TES the closure had “no bearing” on the UTC programme as a whole, and said many other colleges were “thriving”.
hutcHackney University Technical College
Staff & Governors

read ...
Catharine Wensley, Acting Principal
Catharine has worked for twenty years in East London schools and is passionate about providing the best possible education for all young people. She is a specialist in English and literacy, who believes that the ability to read, write and communicate clearly are the keys to success. She was a successful Head of English at Swanlea School, in Whitechapel before becoming the Secondary English Consultant for Tower Hamlets and then The Learning Trust in Hackney. Catharine set up a highly regarded literacy catch-up programme for Y7 students (LIT programme), which is supported by the Education Endowment Fund. Catharine went on to lead on Secondary Teaching and Learning at the Learning Trust and then to work as an Associate Deputy Head in a number of local schools. She has a strong track record of improving progress and attainment at KS4 and is an experienced secondary leader. She started at the Hackney UTC in January 2013 as an Associate Vice Principal and became a Vice Principal in September 2013. Above all, she enjoys working with young people and watching them become the best they can be
.
 
ipprInstitute for Public Policy Research.
Full economic recovery 'will not solve youth unemployment'
13 August 2014
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The IPPR highlights a striking mismatch between what young people are training for and the types of jobs available. For example, it says, 94,000 people were trained in beauty and hair for just 18,000 jobs, while only 123,000 were trained in the construction and engineering sectors for an advertised 275,000 jobs.
wfcwCash to support marginalised people in Waltham Forest
7 October 2014
read ...
East London Advanced Technology Training will run mentoring schemes aimed at teaching vulnerable people new skills while improving employment prospects and quality of life.

ELATT - Connected Learning. Free courses connecting you to the skills you need To succeed in life and work
 
wfcwChannel 4 documentary features Frederick Bremer School
28 August 2014
read ...
Producer Jo Hughes said the Frederick Bremer School was chosen because of its female leadership and strong sense of community.  “This time there is a female headteacher and deputy which we have never seen before."
wfcwEducating the East End in stilettos
Stella Creasy, MP for Walthamstow:
I judge every school leader by the ambitions and standards they set for our local young...
Jenny Smith, the head of Educating the East End’s Frederick Bremer, says her greatest tactic is wearing sky-high stilettos, so she can tower over teenagers at the school, in Walthamstow, London. read ...
   
wfcwEmpty classrooms expose flaws in private colleges boom
21 May 2014
read ...
College called 'the ATM' by students who believe they can obtain loans of up to £11K a year and then not show up
wfcwWatchdog to investigate private colleges' potential misuse of millions
22 May 2014
read ...
Margaret Hodge calls in audit office after Guardian reveals colleges offer access to loans for students who don't attend.
 
wf26 March 2014 - The Waltham Forest Growth Commission has published a range of suggestions aimed at improving the borough's economy
The commission believes Waltham Forest is in an excellent position to encourage inward investment, support business and strengthen skills to lift economic output in ways that improve the lives of its people.
read the report ...
nutshell Walthamstow Guardian report
26th March 2014
read ...
Waltham Forest must improve its high streets, develop an attractive night-time economy and establish a unique ‘brand’ in order to boost the economy, according to an independent report.
The Waltham Forest Growth Commission last night published its findings on the borough's strengths and weaknesses and made recommendations about how to grow the economy.
Waltham Forest currently has the fourth smallest economy in London.
Chaired by Professor Tony Travers from the London School of Economics, the report calls on the council to lead in taking advantage of assets which other areas in London would see as crucial to economic growth, such as good transport links, a high quality public realm and green space, and good housing.
“The commission believes Waltham Forest is in an excellent position to encourage inward investment, support business and strengthen skills to lift economic output in ways that improve the lives of its people,” Professor Travers said.
“Economic growth is fundamental to meeting the needs and aspirations of the residents and businesses of Waltham Forest.”
He said the borough has weathered recent economic difficulties, particularly in securing funding for several flagship projects, and now has significant potential for economic development.
After canvassing thousands of residents and businesses over the last six months, primarily through an online survey, it was deemed that Waltham Forest and its assets were well-known locally, but little-known outside the borough and raising its profile was central to an improved economy.
It was also said that the state of the high streets was a driving factor behind pessimism about economic prospects.
The commission concluded that the borough needs a clear identity to explain why the area is a good place to live and work, building on the industrial and civic history in the borough and a growing creative and artistic sector.
The William Morris Gallery’s recent refurbishment and widespread recognition was noted as a prime example of such a marketing strategy.
“The borough should develop a coherent identity which reflects its current assets, cultural history and four distinct centres [Chingford, Leyton, Leytonstone, and Walthamstow],” the report said.
It was suggested that a bespoke governance structure for each of the area’s main hubs should be considered.
Establishing a designated chamber of commerce was also recommended.
Council leader Chris Robbins said: “We need to continue to work to ensure that we deliver the maximum possible economic and social benefits for our residents and businesses and ensure that they enjoy their fair share of London’s growth and prosperity.”

nutshellComments!
10:26am Wed 26 Mar 14
ruby newbie says...
sadly the only thing this borough deems to be investment is building more and more houses/flats clogging up every thing

1:30pm Wed 26 Mar 14
GavinQ says...
How about building a Dog Track? Or an old-fashioned, Art-Deco Cinema? Or a football stadium? Or even, crazy I know, a Police Station? Wait? What? Oh...

1:40pm Wed 26 Mar 14
mdj says...
'calls on the council to lead in taking advantage of assets which other areas in London would see as crucial to economic growth...';
'Waltham Forest is in an excellent position to encourage inward investment..'
The good professor is too courteous to spell out the point, which is: Why have these good things not been happening in an area with so much to offer?
The answer, as long-term residents already know, is Council neglect, apathy, incompetence, waste and probably corruption, over many, many years.
Does he have any recommendations as to how this could be changed?
Labour have been in overall power here for well over 25 years, after all.

5:34pm Wed 26 Mar 14
NTiratsoo says...
There are some sensible suggestions in this report, but also a sea of platitudes.
More seriously, the commission seems to be ignorant of recent local history. It’s all very well to suggest, as the commission does, that skills providers should work together under the leadership of the Council, and that BIDS companies may be a useful way of promoting business in particular localities, but such solutions already have been tried here – ‘Worknet’ and ‘the E11 BID Co.’ anyone?. Of course, the commission could have done us all a service and reflected on what went wrong in these cases, but that of course would have meant commenting on the leadership in the Town Hall, obviously a bridge too far, particularly because the commissioners appear to have been closely chaperoned throughout by the Council’s head of PR! So what much of the report reads like is the thoughts of a Martian on a brief recce – well intentioned, no doubt, but disconnected from time and place.
Finally, it is a pity that though the commission apparently met seven times, the minutes of only three of its meetings are available on the Council website. Local taxpayers funded the commission: why on earth can’t we read its full deliberations?
Still, it is probably not worth getting too excited. As I pointed out under a previous story, Navigant produced a perfectly respectable report on the local economy in 2010, and that has just gathered dust. In four years time, Professor Travers’ travails no doubt will seem like a similarly long distant memory.

5:41pm Wed 26 Mar 14
NTiratsoo says...
PS I attended a street consultation in Leytonstone about the commission's work, and raised the question of Worknet, only to be told by the staff present: "We don't talk about Worknet anymore".

11:37am Thu 27 Mar 14
David Cowell says...
I would like to see the list of 4 main centres increased to 5 and Highams Park included, not forgotten. It has a mainline train station and is able to add value to the offering in the local economy north of the borough. Additionally I would like to suggest we lobby for creating an identity around green technology in Waltham Forest. Sustainability should be factored in to new developments to ensure that we take advantage of regeneration that points to the future and will increase our magnetic pull in line with our chosen identity. This also falls in line with central government proposals for East London post Olympics.

nutshellWaltham Forest Commission recommendations
WALTHAM FOREST GROWTH COMMISSION 2014
RECOMENDATIONS

read the report ...

LEADING LOCAL GROWTH
RECOMMENDATION 1
Waltham Forest Council should be the lead agency in facilitating work and collaborating with wider stakeholders
to attract growth to the borough.

STANDING OUT IN LONDON
RECOMMENDATION 2
The borough should develop a coherent identity which reflects its current assets, cultural history and its four distinct centres. The Council is best placed to lead on this and provide the initial investment.

STANDING OUT IN LONDON
RECOMMENDATION 3
The borough’s identity should be developed so that residents and businesses will act as its advocates. It should also be used to attract inward investment.

STANDING OUT IN LONDON
RECOMMENDATION 4
The identity should be marketed internally, across London and beyond, and a high profile attraction and investment strategy, highlighting the borough’s cultural, environmental and economic strengths, should be developed to advance it.

STANDING OUT IN LONDON
RECOMMENDATION 5
As with other parts of the city, Waltham Forest has a history of innovation and retains a level of manufacturing capacity unusual for London. It should consider how future investment can build on this heritage to foster a reputation for dynamism in this sector and raise the borough’s profile amongst potential investors.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 6
The borough should develop a cohesive borough-wide high street strategy, which outlines individual plans for each of Waltham Forest’s four main high streets and consider a bespoke governance structure for each area. This will help to strengthen the borough’s identity.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 7
The borough should plan for and actively seek high streets which are an appropriate mix of shops, leisure, cultural, social and residential uses, and a mixed economy of independent and national providers.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 8
The Council should seek to embed the improvements that have already been made to the borough’s public realm and ensure that refurbished high streets continue to be properly maintained. They should also consider what other improvements could be made, for example, provision of free Wi-Fi and improvements to the energy efficiency of high street buildings.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 9
The Council should investigate innovative models of working with strategic partners, including commercial and social enterprises, to develop the borough’s high streets offer and pioneer future models of high street development and ownership.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 10
In order to ensure that all partners and investment are co-ordinated around the plans for each high street, we recommend that some form of managing or governance group be considered for each area. This may take a different form in each area and may build on existing arrangements, for example, Business Improvement Districts (BIDs).

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 11
In creating a mixed economy of independent and larger providers on the high street, the Council should assess the role of high quality ‘anchor’ enterprises, incentivising them, where possible, in order to act as a magnet to wider spending and to generate increased footfall.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 12
The borough should assess what improvements can be made to the evening economy and other convivial spaces, which help generate footfall, spending and improvements to high streets.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 13
We recommend that the Council looks to lever in an investment pot to support the development of its high street plans.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 14
Alongside other local authorities, the borough should continue to campaign for local planning powers so that it can prevent negative clustering where it runs counter to the interests of the high street. It should actively lobby to be a ‘pathfinder’ authority.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HIGH STREET
RECOMMENDATION 15
The Mayor of London, in reviewing the London Plan, and national government should consider how local planning laws can better support their stated aim of creating thriving high streets.

SKILLS AND JOBS
RECOMMENDATION 16
Local skills providers should work together to ensure that local skills provision matches, as far as possible, current and future job opportunities across London. The Council is best positioned to lead a cross-sector approach and we recommend that they investigate whether a public sector ‘community budget’ might best meet the needs of local people.

SKILLS AND JOBS
RECOMMENDATION 17
A mechanism is needed to secure skills provision that meets local needs and the Council should look at what models have been tried elsewhere.

SKILLS AND JOBS
RECOMMENDATION 18
The Council should try to lever in additional specialised training centres to attract businesses to the borough. It should consider becoming a centre of excellence for training and development in London. This would allow residents to access training opportunities, and also prove attractive to future employers looking for somewhere to base their operations.

SKILLS AND JOBS
RECOMMENDATION 19
The Council needs to work closely with neighbouring authorities on opportunities for jobs growth and training.

TRANSPORT
RECOMMENDATION 20
It is clear that transport is a strength for the borough. The borough should consider how it both builds on and maintains these strengths, and finds new ways to meet the future challenges of a changing and growing population. Given that transport is such a strength, the Council should seek a special relationship with Transport for London (TfL) and other bodies with responsibility for transport infrastructure to maintain its advantageous position.

TRANSPORT
RECOMMENDATION 21
We recommend that key problem routes and transport problem areas within the borough are identified, particularly where these might be an impediment to jobs and training or the connectivity of the four high streets, and consider how these might be best improved.

TRANSPORT
RECOMMENDATION 22
The Council should continue to regularly review the impact its parking policies have on the four main high streets.

TRANSPORT
RECOMMENDATION 23
The Council should actively seek grants for innovation in transport. This could include funding for electric vehicles and  working with TfL to secure new Routemasters on the borough’s bus routes.

HOUSING AND LAND USE
RECOMMENDATION 24
In developing the borough’s identity, the Council should recognise the relative affordability of Waltham Forest as a key asset. However, the Council should continue to balance the needs of people moving to the area with those of current residents who may need to access affordable housing as prices continue to rise.

HOUSING AND LAND USE
RECOMMENDATION 25
The Council should maintain its current plans for the level of land safeguarded for industrial and business use. This policy should continue to be reviewed every three to five years to ensure that commercial and industrial activity is able to continue without adversely affecting people’s quality of life and that housing shortages are not impacting on the local economy.

HOUSING AND LAND USE
RECOMMENDATION 26
The Council should consider working with local businesses and neighbouring boroughs already carrying out work to retrofit properties, including those on the high street, so that all local residents are able to make their homes more environmentally sustainable. As part of this the Council should investigate what funding is available for this work.

BUSINESS
RECOMMENDATION 27
The Council’s support package for local businesses is evolving and we recommend that the Council expedite this support and ensure that it is widely understood and regularly monitored so that it meets the needs of the business community. It should consider whether this support is best delivered by the private sector.

BUSINESS
RECOMMENDATION 28
Businesses report a preference for the creation of a Chamber of Commerce, but remain unclear about the gaps in current business support provision. Whilst this change should arguably be private sector-led, the Leader of the Council and the Council’s Chief Executive could usefully assist this process by holding early discussions with the London Chamber of Commerce to investigate a localised offer.

nutshellWaltham Forest Commission Skills and Jobs Recommendations
WALTHAM FOREST GROWTH COMMISSION 2014
SKILLS AND JOBS RECOMMENDATIONS


8.1 Ensuring that people are equipped with the right skills to enable them to find employment is a national issue. Policy-makers across government are still looking for better and different ways to deliver skills training that meets employers’ needs.

 8.2 The evidence presented to the Commission made it clear that Waltham Forest will continue to be a borough where the majority of people living within its boundaries will work elsewhere. This is not necessarily a bad thing, just a fact of life reflective of London’s broader economic and spatial structure. Nor does it mean that existing and new business will not thrive. We will return to the topic of business later in this report.

8.3 What is vital is ensuring that residents have the skills and education to take advantage of current and future job opportunities across London. The capital’s economy is changing rapidly and radically, and we think that more could be done to ensure that residents are equipped to meet the challenges that this poses.

8.4 Whilst Waltham Forest’s GCSE pupils achieved their best ever results in 2013, the Council has recognised that the borough’s schools need to continue to improve. It has embarked upon a school improvement and building programme which aims to put the borough in the top ten education performers in London, whilst becoming a centre of excellence for urban education.

8.5 We are disappointed that so few further education establishments responded to our call for evidence. It would have been useful to hear their views on how they are meeting current challenges and where they see a need for change and reform. Having said this, we believe that further education and skills training are of vital importance to the strengthening of the economy and the fulfilment of residents and businesses aspirations.

8.6 Businesses reported a skills gap in the borough, but struggled to articulate their needs in this area. This is perhaps indicative of national difficulties in finding practical solutions to the question of how to ensure skills provision meets the needs of businesses.

8.7 The Council drew our attention to its investment in the Leyton Skills Construction Centre. This has allowed residents to develop the skills needed not just for employment within the borough, but also within the Olympic Park. The House of Lords Olympic and Paralympic Legacy Committee recently highlighted the opportunities that will exist in the Olympic Park and around its fringe. For example, the iCITY at Hackney was cited. The Committee noted that more needed to be done to ensure that residents in host boroughs were equipped to take advantage of these opportunities.12 12 House of Lords Olympic and Paralympic Legacy Committee, Keeping the Flame Alive (November 2013).

8.8 But this is not the only opportunity for future jobs across London.

8.9 We think that there is a need for an evidence-based approach which maps skills training in the borough to current and future job opportunities across the city. This would help to ensure residents can access good job opportunities and grow the local economy. There may also be a need to try and make accessing information on opportunities that exist more straightforward for people.

8.10 We consider that the Council is best positioned to lead a cross-sector approach to developing skills training. It should play a leadership role in bringing business, education and skills providers together to help map current and future skills provision to meet the skills needs of the wider London economy.

8.11 The borough should consider investigating whether a ‘community budget’, which pools the budgets of all public sector providers, might best support the delivery of skills training.

8.12 The Council might also try to actively attract additional specialised training centres to the borough. Waltham Forest could become known as London’s centre of excellence for training and skills centres. This would allow residents to access training opportunities, but also prove attractive to future employers looking for somewhere to base their operations. Attracting a high profile provider in a growth sector could help boost wider efforts to promote and market the borough as a whole.

SKILLS AND JOBS
RECOMMENDATION 16
Local skills providers should work together to ensure that local skills provision matches, as far as possible, current and future job opportunities across London. The Council is best positioned to lead a cross-sector approach and we recommend that they investigate whether a public sector ‘community budget’ might best meet the needs of local people.

SKILLS AND JOBS
RECOMMENDATION 17
A mechanism is needed to secure skills provision that meets local needs and the Council should look at what models have been tried elsewhere.

SKILLS AND JOBS
RECOMMENDATION 18
The Council should try to lever in additional specialised training centres to attract businesses to the borough. It should consider becoming a centre of excellence for training and development in London. This would allow residents to access training opportunities, but also prove attractive to future employers looking for somewhere to base their operations.

SKILLS AND JOBS
RECOMMENDATION 19
The Council needs to work closely with neighbouring authorities on opportunities for jobs growth and training.

A concerted effort is required by all providers of skills training, working with employers and the Council, to raise skills levels.
Evidence submitted by the Skills Funding Agency “ ”


"Local skills providers should work together to ensure that local skills provision matches, as far as possible, current and future job opportunities across London" - Recommendation 16
 
wfcw3 March 2014 - Waltham Forest Open for Business
Our new Business, Employment and Skills team is making a real difference to our borough
nutshell Letter to WF Principal Employment Training Advisor - 6-3-2014
xxxx xxxxxxx
Principal Employment Training Advisor
London Borough of Waltham Forest
Telephone: 020 8496 6785 / 07791 189419

Dear xxxx xxxxxxx
Thank you for your email.  I am sorry you feel that the information received is not relevant to your area of interest.  Your name was included because it was, erroneously, assumed you were concerned or involved with Waltham Forest’s  education, skills training and business initiatives. 
The information is sent to a number of individual people in the UK and Europe, mostly connected in some way with skills training or employment.  The information sent includes current education and training initiatives in a number of European countries as well as sources of European funding.
Our motivation is that young adults interested in acquiring one or more work related and language skills stand a better chance of finding suitable employment in the UK or in Europe. 
See the Ploteus website: http://ec.europa.eu/ploteus/home_en.htm
Waltham Forest Council’s record in education and skills training is abysmal.
You address has been removed from the list.   Please let me know if you receive any further unwanted emails. 
I would appreciate it if you would indicate which council department is better placed to make use of this kind of information.
In future a ‘remove’ me from the list will be included.

 
LSEYouth Participation in Democratic Life
LSE Final Report, February 2013
read
There is a clear lack of opportunity and political inclusion amongst some young people who are systemically excluded (through poverty, unemployment, linguistic, ethnic or social integration, etc.).
"young people do not believe that politicians sufficiently address their concerns. This could be improved either by political parties making an effort to take youth concerns more seriously, or through the direct elections of young people representatives which would force a campaign on youth-relevant issues."
 
hs2HS2 rail project 'to have dedicated FE college'
England's first new further education college for 20 years
The HS2 high-speed rail project is to have a dedicated further education college to train engineers, Students would be trained in the skills needed to construct the railway, with the college set to open in 2017.  
jail barsSecure college' plans for young offenders
There were approximately 1,300 people in youth custody at the end of 2013, 95% are boys
89% are between 15 and 17-years-old
4% are between 10 and 14
71% re-offend within year of leaving custody
46% of adults leaving prison re-offend
NutshellHS2 rail project 'to have dedicated FE college'
14 January 2014
read  ...
The HS2 high-speed rail project is to have a dedicated further education college to train engineers, ministers have announced.
Students would be trained in the skills needed to construct the railway, with the college set to open in 2017.
This would be England's first new further education college for 20 years.
Sir David Higgins, who is officially beginning his new job as chairman of HS2, said the college would address the problem of a lack of engineers.
'Next generation'
The former Network Rail chief executive warned that too often they "tend to go overseas".
The scale and length of the HS2 project would help to retain engineers in the UK, he said, and the training programme would support the "national skills base".
Business Secretary Vince Cable said the investment in the railway should "also come with investment in the elite skills which will help build it".
Mr Cable said the college would "train the next generation of engineers in rail, construction and environmental studies that this country needs to prosper".
The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills said the college would have "cutting-edge technology and use state-of-the-art equipment" to provide training courses for the specific needs of the rail project, which is expected to generate more than 2,000 apprenticeships.
There are no details yet of where the college would be located or its funding.
But the college would support the building of the HS2 line, which is intended to cut journey times between London, the Midlands and the North of England. The first phase, from London to Birmingham, is due for completion in 2026.
Campaigners against the construction of HS2 have criticised the cost and disruption along the proposed route.
'Elite institution'
Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin said: "HS2 will not only help businesses expand, creating employment; it will also give young people opportunities to get new skills, get a job and a career, become more secure and get on in life.
"When open, it is predicted that HS2 will underpin the delivery of 400,000 jobs."
Skills minister Matthew Hancock said: "It is vital we act now to ensure we have enough skilled people to build HS2 and make sure as many jobs as possible are local.
"This new elite institution with a specific focus on rail construction and maintenance will give learners new skills which respond not only to the needs of HS2, but also to the future of rail engineering, so is vital for Britain's future."
There are 339 further education, sixth-form and other specialist colleges in England, which have been incorporated by act of Parliament.
The proposed new college would be the first to be incorporated for more than 20 years, the business department said.
Liam Byrne, Labour's shadow minister for universities, science and skills, said: "A year ago Ed Miliband urged the government to use the HS2 scheme to boost apprenticeships.
"While any new training opportunities are welcome, particularly when almost a million young people are out of work, it is a shame that this announcement - of 2,000 apprenticeships over the lifetime of the project - doesn't match our ambition of 33,000 new places.
"The Tory-led government has refused to back Labour's plans to use public procurement to create thousands of new apprenticeship opportunities across Britain."
Michele Sutton, president of the Association of Colleges, welcomed that the college would provide "much-needed skills and technical expertise in industry-standard facilities".
"Colleges are already delivering this kind of vocational training, therefore we are keen to learn more of the detail, particularly in relation to value for money and the financial alternatives such as existing colleges also taking on the task of meeting the needs of HS2 by upgrading or adapting existing facilities," she said.

Nutshell'Secure college' plans for young offenders
17 January 2014
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-25766557
Plans to build the first "secure college" for young criminals in England and Wales have been confirmed.
Ministers said the college, set to open in Leicestershire in 2017, would house hundreds of young offenders and double the time they spent in education.
Deputy PM Nick Clegg said the college aimed to cut "sky high" reoffending rates by those left "on the scrapheap".
Labour said building one new facility would do little to cut reoffending across the wider system.
Young offenders are sent to either a secure training centre or a young offenders institution, depending on their age and offences.
Currently, they spend an average of 12 hours a week in education while in detention - but the new college would double that.
The college would have a head teacher, or principal, who would be in the core management team alongside an offender manager. It will eventually house up to 320 young offenders aged between 12 and 17-years-old.
It will be built on land already owned by the government alongside Glen Parva Young Offenders Institution and it will predominantly house people from the East Midlands or east of England.
Ministers are also inviting organisations to compete to provide double the current amount of education given to those held in YOIs.
Nearly three-quarters of young offenders re-offend within a year of being released.
Mr Clegg said: "Criminals can't go unpunished, but young people who've made mistakes and committed crime can't simply be left on the scrapheap. If we expect them to turn their lives around, we have to put their time inside to good use.
"The coalition has reduced the number of young people in custody. But reoffending is sky high in this country and the answer lies in education and opportunity to change.
"Some young offenders spend less than one school day a week in the classroom. By increasing the amount of time young offenders spend learning, we can help them to move away from crime, take responsibility for their actions, and rebuild their lives."
Costs
There were approximately 1,300 people in youth custody at the end of 2013.
Ministers hope that secure colleges will be vastly cheaper than the current four secure training centres (STC), which it wants to close.
It costs almost £250m to detain young offenders, with each place in an STC costing an average of £178,000 a year.
The Ministry of Justice says that the Secure College will provide the same level of security plus greater education for £100,000 less.
"Nearly three-quarters of young offenders who leave custody reoffend within a year," said Justice Secretary Chris Grayling. "Clearly the system as it is at the moment isn't working."
"We must use this time to tackle the root cause of their offending and give them the skills and self-discipline they need to gain employment or training upon release."
For Labour, shadow justice secretary Sadiq Khan said the government's announcement on youth justice was an "admission of failure" from Nick Clegg and Chris Grayling.
He added: "Building the Secure College won't even begin until after the next general election.
"Education is crucial in reforming criminals but building one new establishment in the future will do little to reduce the reoffending rate across the rest of the country.
"The government has also failed to explain how much their plans will cost, nor how they will be funded - leaving fears that other parts of the youth justice budget will be cut to pay for it."
Penelope Gibbs, chair of the Standing Committee for Youth Justice, an umbrella group representing 30 campaign organisations and charities, said: "The children who are locked up in our prisons have a range of very serious needs including mental health problems, drug and alcohol addiction, histories of abuse, trauma and violence.
"Simply focusing on education is misguided and will not address the underlying causes behind their offending that need to be tackled if children are to be turned away from a life of crime.
"A more holistic therapeutic model is needed rather than a gimmicky repackaging of our current costly and broken approach to child custody."

 
Cllr Mark Rusling Waltham Forset Guardian, 18 September 2012
Cllr Rusling: "The key thing around youth unemployment is skills. If you sort out that you'll get young people into jobs
. Obviously schools have a role
to play around literacy and numeracy, but in too many areas there's a disconnect between what happens at school and work. I want to close that gap. 18 September 2012."
 
Will a young person having neither skills nor qualification have a career, or the possibility of one? 
What is the role of the council in providing said skills and qualifications?
 
wfcw4 Nov 2013, Review of Engineering Skills, Prof Perkins - "We should support the UK's young people by preparing them to compete for highly paid, skilled engineering jobs, improving their career prospects and reducing the need to import engineering skills"
NutshellUK recovery 'constrained' by lack of engineers
4 November 2013
read ...
The UK's economic recovery could be "constrained" by a lack of engineering skills, warns a government adviser.

Prof John Perkins, chief scientific adviser at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has identified "a substantial demand for engineers". He has issued "a call to action" to government, industry and educators to "step up" to inspire future engineering talent and address skills shortages.

Business Secretary Vince Cable said too few teenagers were studying science. "Engineers must have a strong foundation in maths and science, especially physics.

Early intervention
"The number of young people choosing these subjects post-16 is relatively low, especially amongst women," said Mr Cable.

In his Review of Engineering Skills, Prof Perkins says the UK already relies on "inward migration" to fill skilled jobs in key sectors such as oil and gas extraction, aerospace, and computer, electronic and optical engineering.

"This should not be our long-term solution.

"We should support the UK's young people by preparing them to compete for highly paid, skilled engineering jobs, improving their career prospects and reducing the need to import engineering skills," says the review. It calls for "purposeful and effective early intervention to enthuse tomorrow's engineers" and ensure they have the "solid academic foundations to engage in the subject".

The report calls for as many young people as possible to study "rigorous curricula in maths and science". In particular it says the UK lags behind its competitors in the number of 16- to 18-year-olds studying maths.

'Misconceptions'

Prof Perkins says the profession suffers "from widespread misconceptions and lack of visibility that deter young people, and especially girls from pursuing it as a career".

The report refers to polling carried out for the Tomorrow's Engineers Week campaign, which suggests that only half of 11- to 14-year olds would consider a career in engineering.

This dropped to 35% among girls and only 24% of parents of girls said they thought engineering was a suitable profession for their daughters.

Prof Perkins draws "some comfort that we are heading in the right direction" with initiatives to inspire future engineers, a focus on maths and science in schools, more apprenticeships and "our continued strength in higher education". His 22 recommendations urge both short and long term action to "get the right messages to young people" - particularly girls, to ensure vocational training is high quality and high status and that "higher education continues to deliver".

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills said it was making available nearly £49m to boost engineering skills.

Long-term task
From January some £30m of this money will allow employers to bid for match-funding for training schemes to address specific engineering skills shortages. Another £18m will fund an elite training facility in Coventry, while Tomorrow's Engineers will get £250,000 to encourage schoolchildren into engineering.

Terry Scuoler, chief executive of EEF, the manufacturers' organisation, which represents almost 6,000 companies, said: "The report rightly shines the spotlight on the need for a pipeline of talented future engineers, with credible recommendations on how this can be achieved. "Whilst this is a long-term task, the message from employers is clear - we are ready to take on the challenge."

Anne Spackman of the charity Career Academies which runs internship schemes to prepare schoolchildren for employment said efforts to "grow the number of potential recruits" into engineering were crucial. "Engineering is an area rich in job opportunities but lacking the skilled workers to fill them," said Ms Spackman.

 
wfcw30 Oct 2013 - Businesses can access training support aimed at improving staff skill levels. Waltham Forest Council announced the programme today as part of a drive to boost the borough's economy, which is one of the smallest in London.
NutshellCouncil announces new skills pledge
30th October 2013
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Businesses can access training support aimed at improving staff skill levels. Waltham Forest Council announced the programme today as part of a drive to boost the borough's economy, which is one of the smallest in London.
The authority’s Adult Learning Service will offer any business in the borough with 10 or more employees a bespoke training programme. Some of the courses being offered address leadership and management, customer service, ICT and business regulation compliance.
Visit www.walthamforestclass.gov.uk/working-with-employers for more information.

 
NavigantNavigant Consulting
London Borough of Waltham Forest, Local Economic Assessment, Nov 2010
.
In Waltham Forest skills levels are very low, as in most of EastLondon. Waltham Forest ranks 377th out of 408 local areas in Great Britain on overall skills and qualifications scores. There are more Asian/Asian British unemployed in Waltham Forest than any other ethnic grouping.
read full report
Nutshell A few main points from the report
Fig 7.5.3: Proportion of population living in Lone parent Households (2008)
In 2008, there were a significant number of people – 56,041 – living in Lone parent households in Waltham Forest. This means a quarter of the borough’s population live in Lone parent households, which is the highest proportion in London, and nearly twice the national average, and nearly 50% more than the London average. Within this, 40,476 live in households where all the children are dependent on the parent, which is potentially a significant issue for the borough as – nationally – an average of 4% of those households have a parent in employment.

Table 4.9.1: Business and Economy assessment summary 
Large firms (employing 200+) are usually the major drivers of productivity in a local area. While
Waltham Forest has a number of large regeneration sites, and strategic industrial locations that could locate new large businesses coming to the area, the potential for such inward investment is viewed by partners are unlikely.
The Inward Investment market – particularly for Foreign Direct Investment is risk adverse, and companies will not take a chance on locating to an area without a strong track record as a business location.  Ethnic minorities are less likely to run businesses in the borough. 
Despite a large and diverse ethnic minority population, there is a relative lack of entrepreneurialism – particularly among the Pakistani community. This analysis offers the opportunity to promote enterprise among certain communities – which could have community cohesion as well as economic benefits.

Summary: Key Issues, 2010
  • Skills levels in Waltham Forest are very low, as in most of East London. Waltham Forest ranks 377th out of 408 local areas in Great Britain on overall skills and qualifications scores.
  • Males are more likely to be unemployed, and females are more likely to be economically inactive. Ethnic minorities are more likely to be effected by worklessness.
  • Waltham Forest has a higher proportion of small businesses than London, the Host Boroughs and North East London. 2.6% of employers provide 50.1% of jobs in the borough.
  • Micro‐businesses (employing 10 or less people) are the most significant employer in Waltham Forest – providing 27.1% of jobs. This is unique to the borough among comparator areas.
  • Waltham Forest has the smallest overall production and is the least productive borough in London
  • The borough has low skills levels, which is critical to employment risk, and levels of unemployment and economic inactivity
  • The profile of those economically inactive ‘Seeking work but unavailable’ are very likely to be young and male in Waltham Forest.
  • Men are far more likely to be unemployed in Waltham Forest than women. The differential between rates of unemployment by gender in the borough is the highest is London.
  • There are more Asian/Asian British unemployed in Waltham Forest than any other ethnic grouping. Asian/Asian British residents are nearly three times as likely to be unemployed as White residents, and twice as likely as Black/Black British residents.
  • Economic inactivity is concentrated in the Asian/Asian British population of the borough, and predominantly amongst women.
  • Of those who are economically inactive, the proportion of Asian/Asian British who are “not seeking but want a job” is strikingly low.

 
Evening Standard We need new skills to fight inequality
4 Feb 2013
more ....
A more efficient society requires different skills and behaviour if it is not to be associated with greater inequality. We have a world of declining inequality between countries but increasing inequality within them. There is a lot to be done.
 
NEETNEET unemployment - November 2013
Waltham Forest experienced a 3.6% rise in NEET 16-24 year old unemployment for 2013 (Jul 12 - Jun 13 v Jul 11 - Jun 12) compared with 2012 for the same period. This compares to an average of 1.4% across all London boroughs.
NutshellNEET employment data for November 2013
Labour Market Update - November 2013
This report uses the most recent NOMIS employment data, which is published with a three month time lag and covers the 12 month period up to June 2013. Improvements to the processing of employment datasets by ONS mean that datasets will now be released approximately 3.5 months after the end of each quarterly period (three to six months earlier than previously). The next update is due on 22nd January 2014 and will cover the 12 months to September 2013.
Downlod NEET data - (see p 13)
neet

 
UK Unicef child well-being ranking

Unicef child well-being ranking, UK
10 April 2013
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The report identifies figures showing the UK as having the lowest rates of further education in the developed world, with fewer than 75% of young people studying, compared with more than 80% in other populous developed countries.

But it is also found that in the period assessed, the UK had the highest rates of young people not in education, employment, or training, affecting 10% of 15 to 19-year-olds.

Education Minister David Laws added: "This report shows that Labour's approach of simply pouring money into the system without meaningful reform has not been enough.

Unicef UK warned that the improvement seen under the Labour government risks being reversed by coalition cuts.
It added that "since 2010 the downgrading of youth policy and cuts to local government services are having a profound negative effect".
Anita Tiessen, deputy executive director of Unicef UK, said: "There is no doubt that the situation for children and young people has deteriorated in the last three years, with the government making policy choices that risk setting children back in their most crucial stages of development."

UNICEF - United Kingdom - Statistics
UNICEF - UK children face 'bleaker future'
 
LiteracyOECD Reviews of Vocational Education and Training
Damning report: An international study has found that the UK's young people are 'among the least literate and numerate in the developed world' - Deeply worrying' report shows scale of problems with UK education system. Literacy and numeracy tables show England 22 and 21 out of 24 countries. 'School leavers among the least literate and numerate in developed world.' Report's author OECD admits research 'doesn’t look good for the UK '
Read ...
NutshellOECD: Problems with UK education system
8 October 2013
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The study found 16 to 24-year-olds are among the least literate and numerate in the world, lagging behind those in countries including Estonia, Poland and the Slovak Republic.
England came 22nd out of 24 countries for the reading skills of its young people and 21st for maths, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
  • 'Deeply worrying' report shows scale of problems with UK education system
  • Literacy and numeracy tables show England 22 and 21 out of 24 countries
  • 'School leavers among the least literate and numerate in developed world'
  • Government calls them 'Labour’s children force-fed a diet of dumbing down'
  • Report's author OECD admits research 'doesn’t look good for the UK'
  • England only country where those retiring have better skills than the young
  • Labour says years of rising GCSE grades proves they 'drove up standards'
  • England is the only developed country producing school leavers who are worse at maths and reading than their grandparents, according to a damning report.

Damning report:
An international study has found that the UK's young people are 'among the least literate and numerate in the developed world' The figures showed many Japanese school leavers are more advanced than English university graduates.
The OECD said England was the only country where the oldest age group studied (55-65) had a higher proficiency in literacy and numeracy than the youngest (16-24) after other factors such as sex, socio-economic background and type of occupation were taken into account.  
The organisation warned England would struggle with competitors in global markets unless urgent action was taken.
England was the only country in developed world in which those aged 55-65 performed better than 16-24-year-olds England was the only country in developed world in which those aged 55-65 performed better than 16-24-year-olds

LABOUR'S EDUCATION BILLIONS 'FAILED TO RAISE STANDARDS'
Today's findings show that the billions poured into education by Labour failed to push up standards of literacy and numeracy, critics have said.
The Government has claimed that the OECD's research underlines who 'Labour's children, educated under a Labour government and force-fed a diet of dumbing down and low expectations.'
Official figures from the Office for National Statistics have shown that Labour’s spending on education rose from £35.3billion in 2000 to £63.9billion in 2009.
Yet it appears large numbers left school with no improvements in standards when compared to previous generations.
Last year a different report found despite Tony Blair declaring his priorities as ‘education, education, education’ when he swept to power in 1997, a huge increase in spending on schools led to ‘no improvement in student learning outcomes’.
The OECD study – Education at a Glance – found that expenditure on UK primary and secondary schools and colleges as a percentage of GDP increased from 3.6 per cent in 1995 to 4.5 per cent in 2009, higher than the OECD average of four per cent. At the same time, there has been ‘no improvement in student learning outcomes’, the report said

Spending in the sector soared by 78 per cent from £50billion to £89billion by the time the party lost the election in 2010. During this period, GCSE and A-level grades rose every year, which critics claimed was evidence of dumbing down.
Andreas Schleicher, of the OECD, said young adults had more qualifications than those nearing retirement, but not greater abilities. This indicated that there had been grade inflation and that qualifications did not necessarily mean better skills. The finding ‘doesn’t look good for the UK’, Mr Schleicher said.

The 466-page study was the first carried out by the OECD into the work skills of 16 to 65-year-olds, establishing their abilities in literacy, numeracy and problem solving.
A total of 166,000 were interviewed in 24 countries, including 9,000 in England and Northern Ireland. Scotland and Wales were not covered.
The study found a quarter of adults in England (8.5million) have the maths skills of a ten-year-old, with a large minority only able to perform sums with whole numbers.
Literacy levels are also below average, with 16.4 per cent of adults (5.8million) reading at the level of a child in the penultimate year of primary school.
Just 42.4 per cent of young adults were proficient in problem solving. This was around 8 percentage points less than the average of 50.7 per cent, and 21 behind the best-performing country, South Korea.
England produced 8 per cent of the world’s most highly skilled workers in the late 1960s and 70s. This has dropped to 4 per cent and the trend is expected to continue.
The report said the ‘talent pool of highly skilled adults in England... is likely to shrink relative to that of other countries’ in the next few decades.
The slide could be reversed only if ‘significant action is taken to improve skills proficiency among young people’.
England also lags behind other nations in the proportion of people continuing with education into adulthood. One positive note was that the country has been successful in making good use of its pool of skilled talent, resulting in high productivity and wages.

The Coalition has taken steps to improve education, demanding an end to grade inflation and making courses and exams tougher. The number of top GCSE and A-level grades has now decreased for the past two years.
John Allan, of the Federation of Small Businesses, said: ‘The OECD report highlights what our members tell us – that young people don’t have the literacy and numeracy skills to do the job properly. We need action to improve these crucial basic skills from an early age.’
The shadow education secretary, Tristram Hunt, defended Labour’s record, saying it ‘drove up standards in maths and English across our schools, evident in the huge improvements we saw in GCSE results between 1997 and 2010’.

Mike Harris, of the Institute of Directors, said the report ‘underlines the credibility gap between the picture painted by decades of rises in exam pass rates and employers’ real-world experience of interviewing and employing people’.

Former Labour education and employment secretary David Blunkett questioned the OECD’s methodology and said the report ‘warranted united action, not party political point scoring’.
Education has undergone massive change since Labour began replacing grammar schools with the comprehensive system in 1965.
In 1988 GCSEs replaced O-levels and the National Curriculum was introduced, and in 1997 Labour abolished the Assisted Places Scheme awarding free places at fee-paying schools to gifted children from low or middle-income families.
The academy schools programme began in 2000, with schools funded by the state and made independent of local government control.
In 2010 the Coalition launched free schools, which are similar to academies but can be set up by groups including parents, teachers, charities.

 
Part time studentFall in part time student numbers students numbers have fallen by 40% in two years
Fall in part time student numbers students numbers have fallen by 40% in two years, equivalent to a reduction of 105,000. There are concerns that such part-time courses are necessary to provide the skills needed by industry. Sir Eric Thomas, who headed the review, said "something is going wrong". There has been widespread recognition of the economic importance of part-time courses in allowing adults to improve their skills.
NutshellFears over 40% fall in part-time students
16 October 2013
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The fee increase has seen numbers fall in part-time students, not full-time
A "perfect storm" of causes is leading to a rapid and worrying decline in part-time student numbers in England, university leaders have warned.
The Universities UK study blames rising fees, pressure on household budgets and reduced support from employers.
It examines why part-time students have fallen by 40% in two years, equivalent to a reduction of 105,000.
There are concerns that such part-time courses are necessary to provide the skills needed by industry.
Sir Eric Thomas, who headed the review, said "something is going wrong".
There has been widespread recognition of the economic importance of part-time courses in allowing adults to improve their skills.

Economic value
Most of the 500,000 students taking part-time courses are adults, a majority are women and most will be studying a vocational or work-related course.

This obvious decline cannot be swept under the carpet any longer”
Rachel Wenstone National Union of Students

But the numbers have been been tumbling for two years and the report says that next year's recruitment figures do not suggest that this downward trend will be reversed.
Professor Thomas, who is vice-chancellor of Bristol University, said: "The reality is that the UK needs more graduates and relies heavily on part-time higher education to meet these fast-changing skills needs in a fast-changing world.
"We ignore part-time study's transformative power for individuals and society at our peril.
"In England in particular, numbers are declining and do not look like rallying."
The report says that the sharp decline in numbers reflects a combination of factors.

'Urgent push'
It calls for part-time courses to be seen as an integral part of higher education and "not as an add-on".
"There needs to be an urgent push at all levels - national, regional and local - to help potential students and employers understand the value of and opportunities for part-time higher education," says the report.

It's shocking that the number of part-time undergraduate students has plummeted over the last two years”
Katja Hall CBI

Rachel Wenstone, National Union of Students vice president, said there needed to be more thought about how part-time degree courses were compatible with people's lives.
"This obvious decline cannot be swept under the carpet any longer - there needs to be a collective response from all levels to the challenges that these groups of students are facing," she said.
The Confederation of British Industry's chief policy director, Katja Hall, said: "It's shocking that the number of part-time undergraduate students has plummeted over the last two years.
"For our economy to stay competitive we'll need more people with higher levels of skills, so it's more important than ever that working people have the opportunity to re-train and up-skill."
Alex Bols, executive director of the 1994 Group of research-intensive universities, said: "A decline in part-time study could hamper the UK's attempts to extend its skills base and economic growth."

 
FE collegeMinisters want to improve the numeracy and literacy skills of those studying vocational courses at FE colleges. The announcement by the BIS comes amid concerns from employers that employees have poor maths and English skills.
Nutshell£20k lure for maths graduates to be college teachers

1 August 2013
read ...
Related Stories
    Poor numeracy 'is ruining lives'
    Many adults 'child-like at maths'
    Jobs 'eBay' for young engineers
Maths graduates are to be offered £20,000 to teach in England's further education colleges, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills says.
Grants of around £9,000 will also be available to graduates who opt to teach English or work with those with special educational needs (SEN) in colleges.
Ministers want to improve the numeracy and literacy skills of those studying vocational courses at FE colleges.
Unions said the move proved good graduates were not queuing up to teach.
The announcement by the BIS comes amid concerns from employers that employees have poor maths and English skills.
Around 8.1 million people - 24% of the working-age population in England - lack basic maths skills, the government's most recent Skills for Life Survey suggests, while 5.1 million (15%) struggle with literacy.
'Recruit brightest and best'
The funding will be available for college trainees from September.
Business, Innovation and Skills Secretary Vince Cable said: "Too many businesses tell me they cannot find young people with the numeracy and literacy skills they need.
"It's not just those planning on going to university who need to have a firm grasp of English and maths. These basic competencies are needed for all types of employment and it is not possible to enter a full apprenticeship until then.

This is another admission by the government that its policies are driving graduates away from teaching and lecturing as a career” - Dr Mary Bousted Association of Teachers and Lecturers

"This government money will help. It will help more young people get the skills needed to get a job."
Skills Minister Matthew Hancock said: "These bursaries will help us recruit the brightest and best teachers so we can improve standards and provide people with the basic skills they need for a rewarding career.
"They will also make sure that we promote excellence in special needs teaching so that we protect members of our society that are potentially the most vulnerable."
Dr Mary Bousted, general secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, welcomed the initiative but expressed concern about skills losses in FE colleges.
"The dearth of specialist maths, English and SEN teachers has partly been caused by massive redundancies in FE in the last few years, with the loss of teachers and trainers with years of knowledge and experience.
'Considerable challenges'
"This is another admission by the government that its policies are driving graduates away from teaching and lecturing as a career.
"If well-qualified graduates were queuing up to become lecturers in these specialist vocational areas, the government would not have to offer large amounts of money to tempt them to do so."
Joy Mercer, of the Association of Colleges, said funding for teacher training was welcome.
"It is useful that government has committed to initial teacher training grants for 2013-14 graduates so that colleges can start recruiting straightaway, but funding has only been confirmed for the next two years and a short-term funding commitment risks limiting the benefits.
"Colleges also face considerable challenges in attracting people with excellent applied maths skills and relevant vocational expertise who may not be graduates or be looking to undertake initial teacher training.
"We would welcome further discussions with government, its agencies and partners as to how the sector can be helped to attract these types of people from industry into the college classroom."

 
BBCFE college teaching 'must improve', says Labour
21 May 2013
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Waltham Forest CollegeWaltham Forest College
Apprentices celebrate their success as they graduate from their course and enter the working world
NutshellWaltham Forest College apprentices celebrate their success
21st March 2013
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Apprentices are celebrating their success as they graduate from their course and enter the working world. Waltham Forest College’s Rail Track Engineering class of 2012 left the college with a 90% success rate, this week, some of them already employed at Liverpool Street Station.
Politicians and senior members of staff from the College met with the class to congratulate them
The College’s Principal, Robin Jones said that the hard work put in by the students would now be worth it. He said: “Organisations are seeing the benefits of apprentices far more than in the recent past. “You have a bright future ahead of you.”
The college has now taken on 16 apprentices in the class of 2013, who were all carefully selected from 165 applications.

 
The Waltham Forest Construction Centre provides construction skills training courses
NutshellWaltham Forest Construction Training Centre
Waltham Forest Construction Centre provides construction skills training courses in:
Hollydown Way, Leytonstone E11 4DD
http://www.walthamforest.gov.uk/Pages/ServiceChild/Construction-training-centre.aspx
  • Steel fixing
  • Introduction to general construction
  • Kerb laying
  • Drain laying
  • Paving
  • Flooring
  • Work at heights
  • Introduction to roofing
  • Roofing
  • Rail track safety or tunnel skills passport

The courses are run by the National Construction College 
Courses schedule
Steel fixing
This course will introduce the learner to the various types of reinforcement used in the construction industry today. The course will include the different types of ties in everyday use, steel shapes, sizes, basic drawings, schedules and design elements when constructing basic ground beams, floor slabs and retaining walls.
Roofing
This course will introduce delegates to types of roofing used in the construction industry, including the different types of tiles, battening techniques in everyday use and constructing a basic everyday roof.

General Construction Appreciation
This course will introduce the delegate to the various elements of construction. These include kerb laying, block paving and basic drain laying used in the construction industry. The delegate will be taught basic skills and given a basic knowledge of how to use and read drawings and include the different types of techniques used to lay kerbs, lay block paving and lay drains.

How to apply
To find out more about the training places that are available at the NCC East London campus at the Waltham Forest Construction Training Centre please call 0344 994 4433 or visit www.nationalconstructioncollege.co.uk.


 
Olympic legacy training centre'A multi-million pound construction training centre hailed as an Olympic legacy for Waltham Forest has delivered just a fraction of the promised number of apprenticeships for local people. Figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act also suggest that the majority of such trainees at the Cathall Road National Skills Academy in Leytonstone are not even from Waltham Forest.
NutshellUnemployed 'let down by Olympic legacy training centre'
1st March 2013
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A multi-million pound construction training centre hailed as an Olympic legacy for Waltham Forest has delivered just a fraction of the promised number of apprenticeships for local people.
Figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act also suggest that the majority of such trainees at the Cathall Road National Skills Academy in Leytonstone are not even from Waltham Forest.
When the £7.24million centre opened late in 2010, Waltham Forest Council claimed that it would provide 160 annual apprenticeships and give training for 1,000 unemployed local people every year.
But it has now emerged that just 105 apprentices studied at the centre between 2010 and 2012.
And there were only 91 apprentices and funded learners living in postcodes entirely or partly in Waltham Forest during that time - 19 per cent of the total.
It comes just months after a council panel was set up to investigate failures of the authority's unemployment programme Worknet, which also failed to hit its targets.
Part of Worknet included a partnership with the National Construction College organisation, which was awarded the contract to run the centre by the council.

 
Olympic legacy training centre'The Worknet debacle - NRF, BNI, O'Regen, Kennedy Scott and Reed
Council a
dmits to long-term failings to help unemployed in Waltham Forest.
 
Technicak trainingThe aim is to give vocational education the same status as academic study says the government
Technical courses for 16 to 19-year-olds will gain the same status as A-levels from 2014 but only if they attract business or university support, the government has announced.
NutshellTech-levels to have A-level status in skills plan
4 July 2013
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The aim is to give vocational education the same status as academic study says the government
Technical courses for 16 to 19-year-olds will gain the same status as A-levels from 2014 but only if they attract business or university support, the government has announced.
The Tech-level qualifications are aimed at raising the status of vocational qualifications in England.
The overhaul follows concerns about variable quality.
One awarding body said it was "incorrect" to infer that other skills qualifications were worthless.
The changes will mean that only vocational courses that achieve Tech-level status will count in the secondary league tables for 16 to 19-year-olds from 2016. Some 80% of vocational qualifications for this age group will be removed.
There will be two types of vocational qualification under the new system.
Practical training
Tech-levels will take as long to complete as A-Levels and will need to be endorsed by either a professional association or by five employers registered with Companies House.
These qualifications will focus on hands-on practical training, leading to recognised occupations for example in engineering, computing, accounting or hospitality.
In addition, Applied General Qualifications will take the same time to complete as AS-levels and will focus on broader study of a technical area, not directly linked to an occupation.
These qualifications will need backing from three universities to count in performance tables.
A Tech-level along with a core maths qualification, for example AS-level maths, and an extended project will amount to an over-arching Technical Baccalaureate, says the government.
The shake-up comes after a review of vocational qualifications for the government by Prof Alison Wolf two years ago, which suggested that the current system was failing young people, with schools tempted to teach qualifications that attracted the most points in school performance tables.
Life chances
This meant students were steered to take qualifications that might not help them into work or higher education, she suggested.
Last year the government announced controls on which vocational qualifications for 14- to 16-year-olds would count in the school league tables.
On Thursday, the Skills Minister, Matthew Hancock, said: "High-quality rigorous vocational education is essential to future prosperity and the life chances of millions.
"Because technical education is so important, it is vital the qualifications young people take are stretching, high-quality and support their aspirations.
"These reforms are unashamedly aspirational and will ensure Tech-levels help people into apprenticeships and jobs."
Chris Jones, director general of the vocational skills awarding body City and Guilds, said: "The excessive focus on league tables in today's announcement is potentially very damaging.
"By only including Tech-level qualifications in the league tables, it infers that many other vocational qualifications are worthless. This is incorrect.
'Gold standard'
"As shown by recent research from the IPPR [Institute for Public Policy Research], countries that have more young people engaged in vocational education see lower levels of youth unemployment."
The CBI said it backed the principle but would need reassurance that the system would "need to command respect across entire sectors" and not just be run by a "handful of firms".
Neil Carberry, CBI director of employment and skills, said: "The litmus test is that Tech-levels offer the gold-standard training that employers want while not being seen as second-class.
"Courses must have stretching subject knowledge, rigorous assessment, hard-nosed practical experience, and be a stepping stone to a great career.
"The new system must be very clear about which provision is deemed 'occupational' and which is to be 'applied general'.
"Perception is all with qualifications, so we must avoid a two-tier system, where one is seen as too narrow and the other as too broad.
"We want to see the more rigorous Tech-level brand extended to both."
'Restrictive'
Gill Clipson, of the Association of Colleges, supported the call for qualifications to be approved by universities and businesses, but warned that "creating three separate 'routes' which segregate qualifications into pre-determined categories with pre-determined destinations is too restrictive".
She added: "It is unlikely to be the best way to give students the opportunity to choose the right mix of qualifications."
Brian Lightman of the Association of School and College Leaders warned that "developing high quality vocational qualifications that have A level status is a complex and highly specialised task and the timescale set is challenging in the extreme".
Labour's Tristram Hunt said: "After three years of the government downgrading vocational education, there are almost a million young people unemployed.
"It's no surprise that David Cameron and Michael Gove are now desperately playing catch up, while Labour sets the agenda on skills.
"It is right that pupils have a choice of taking new vocational courses, but Michael Gove needs to reassure parents that it will be a gold standard to sit alongside A-levels and not an afterthought.
"Labour's plans for a Tech Bacc would ensure that pupils do rigorous vocational courses accredited by employers, English and maths to 18 and a quality work experience placement."

 
IDSDfE, Iain Duncn Smith MP, Underperforming FE colleges, Cllr Stella Creasy, Frankie Boyle and the workfare vote, Joan Bakewell, failing colleges, Leonard Cheshire Disability, Studio schools, Olympics turned Leyton High Road into a "ghost town"
Nutshell Government, politics and exclusion
DFEDepartment for Education cuts 1,000 jobs
14 November 2012
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The department plans to cut its administrative budget by 50% (£290m) by the end of this parliament
About 1,000 jobs at the Department for Education (DfE) - a quarter of its total workforce - are being cut in an efficiency drive. The cuts are part of a plan to reduce its administrative budget by 50% - £290m - by 2015/16.

IDS

The government's flagship welfare-to-work programme has failed to hit its main target.
27 November 2012
Welfare-to-work: Official figures show job target missed. The government's flagship welfare-to-work programme has failed to hit its main target, official figures show.
Under the scheme, firms and charities are paid to help find jobs for the long-term unemployed. But only 3.53% of people found a job for six months or more - missing the coalition's 5.5% target.
The coalition said the scheme was "improving" at getting people into work, but Labour called its effect "worse than doing nothing" more ...
Stella CreasyWalthamstow MP Stella Creasy slammed by comedian Frankie Boyle over workfare vote
20th March 2013
Comedian Frankie Boyle has publicly criticised Walthamstow MP Stella Creasy for not voting against controversial government "workfare" reforms.
 Workfare was introduced by the Department of Work and Pensions, which is headed by Chingford MP Iain Duncan Smith, in 2011.  Under the scheme, people on Jobseeker's Allowance who have not managed to get a job after completing a work training programme are forced to carry out unpaid work in order to keep receiving their benefits.
But yesterday the government rushed through retrospective legislation to allow Workfare to continue. [1]
[2]
Joan BakewellJoan Bakewell urges action on part-time students
8 April 2013
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Baroness Bakewell, president of Birkbeck, University of London, served as the government's voice of older people from 2008 -10. She is urging the government to back efforts to stem the dramatic drop in part-time students. She, says higher fees and a failure to communicate new rights to government loans for part-time students has led to a 40% drop in England.
BricksFailing colleges face intervention under skills plan
3 April 2013
Underperforming further education (FE) colleges in England are to face a tougher regime, as the government launches its skills strategy. There will be an "administered college" status which will place restrictions on spending and staff. Skills minister Matthew Hancock promised "swift and effective action" where colleges were inadequate.
Construction projects
The Rigour and Responsiveness in Skills strategy sets out plans for a more rapid intervention.
A further education commissioner will advise ministers on how to improve colleges which are inadequate.This might include the "administered college" status, where the college will have to surrender control of spending and assets. Struggling colleges could also have their governing bodies replaced or be completely dissolved.  "Where colleges are failing learners we will be knocking on their doors and take swift and effective action.
"It is a dereliction of duty to let failing colleges teach young people. We will not fail in our duty to act," said Mr Hancock."All providers should meet tough standards of rigour and responsiveness. Through these reforms we will be able to intervene without hesitation where they fall short."
'Undermining'
But Shadow Minister for FE, Gordon Marsden, said: "We want to better safeguard quality in the skills system, including through a new gold standard qualification in our proposal for a TechBacc to help the forgotten 50% who don't go to university.
Martin Doel, chief executive of the Association of Colleges, said: "This new investment in college capital is a very welcome acknowledgement of their contribution to economic recovery. "New buildings and facilities improve the student experience and help attract further investment from business   "All colleges strive to improve and we will continue to discuss with government how best to intervene on the rare occasions when they fail."
Businesses
Neil Carberry, the CBI's director for employment and skills policy, said: "The government's skills strategy identifies that this requires a demand-led system, with businesses squarely in the driving seat.
"The challenge now is to successfully hand over control to employers to refocus training on industry needs and getting people into jobs and good careers - this will require a shake-up of the funding system."
The University and College Union said an emphasis on the small number of colleges judged to be inadequate was unhelpful.
UCU general secretary, Sally Hunt, said: "The emphasis on failing colleges is disappointing at a time when private companies have made no secret of their desire to move into areas of post-16 education that they believe might turn a profit.
"There must be clear protection of public assets and a transparent process for any intervention in our colleges. This simply cannot be privatisation by the back door.
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Policy paper Rigour and Responsiveness in Skills
A plan of action to update skills priorities for England to make the system more rigorous and responsive to need. - DfE, DBI&S
Running Ever Faster Down the Wrong Road"
An Alternative Future for Education and Skills. Professor Frank Coffield, Inaugural Lecture
Leonard Cheshire Disability Leonard Cheshire Disability providing help for young disabled people in Waltham Forest to find work
10th April 2013
Young disabled children are being given the chance to work and learn new skills.
Disabled children aged 16 to 25 in Waltham Forest who are not in education, training or employment are invited to be part of a ‘Worksmart’ scheme run by Leonard Cheshire Disability.
The voluntary organisation will work with them to find the right job, or to gain the skills to get it on the two-and-a-half year long scheme.
The organisation claims 11 per cent of London’s population is young and disabled and far more likely to be unemployed.
Leonard Cheshire Disability
More work-based 'studio schools' announced More work-based 'studio schools' announced
10 April 2013
Thirteen new "studio schools" are to be set up in England from September next year, it has been announced. It will bring to more than 40 the total number of this new breed of schools, which mix academic studies with work-based training.
The schools are for pupils aged 14 and over and the idea is for local employers to be involved. The latest involve Barclays, The National Trust, RSPCA and The National Space Centre among others. About 100 national and local employers are involved.

 
BBCMore than £6.5m of tax payers' money was paid out on fraudulent student loan applications last year, data shows.
Nutshell Criminal gangs target Student Loans Company
5 August 2013
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More than £6.5m of tax payers' money was paid out on fraudulent student loan applications last year, data shows.
Some 2,450 applications from England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the EU were deemed suspect, figures obtained by Radio 4's You & Yours showed.
And in 875 cases, payments were made before suspicions were raised.
The Student Loans Company (SLC) said it works with police to tackle the problem and that it was being targeted by "organised and sophisticated gangs."
The figures mean that three times more student loan applications were cancelled last year due to suspected fraud than the year before - which is seven times more than in 2009.
While on the rise, the figures remains small with about 1% of the total number of accounts linked to fraud.
Undetected
The SLC said part of the rise was due to new systems successfully identifying bogus applications.
It estimated these measures prevented a further £13.8m of fraud, but the company acknowledged some offences do go undetected.
In May this year, the ringleaders of a plot which made £380,000 from the SLC were sentenced to a total of seven years in prison.

Students are often targeted at the three main instalment dates”
Heather Laing Student Loans Company

The scam involved providing false exam certificates to applicants who then applied for university courses and student loans.
The gang then charged £1,000 for the documents and took a cut from the loan payments.
In a different case in 2011, another gang targeted students directly rather than the SLC.
Thousands of individuals were sent so-called phishing emails which appeared to be from the loans company asking them to update their details.
Instead of the official website, the links in the emails directed them to a site controlled by another gang. A total of £1.6m was taken from hundreds of students across the UK.
Heather Laing, fraud prevention manager at the SLC, said a team of 24 people were dedicated to tackling fraud and worked with police.
She added: "Students are often targeted at the three main instalment dates in September, January and April and they need to work with us to ensure their identity and financial details are protected and not compromised."

 
Doemaker dotDuran Williams aka Doemaker Dot talks to Amie Mulderrig about his music
“Where I lived there was always a lot going on – robberies, gang wars and everything in between“
NutshellMoving towards social exclusion in Waltham Forest
Doemaker dotDoemaker Dot - Hometown Glory
Duran Williams aka Doemaker Dot talks to Amie Mulderrig about his music

Growing up in Waltham Forest, the events and situations that took place in the area provided him with great inspiration to write his lyrics.
“Where I lived there was always a lot going on – robberies, gang wars and everything in between,“ he says. “But in the midst of all this, there was a real positive number of people achieving and chasing their dreams. .

Waltham Forest Council needs to connect with its many marginalised communities, some indigenous, others recently arrived.
Council urgently needs a long term vision for its education and training strategy to replace the current political battleground of different ideologies, values and visions.
Riot report reveals '500,000 forgotten families' - BBC March 2012
A lack of support and opportunity for young people contributed to the outbreak of riots in England last year, an independent report has concluded. Schools which fail to teach pupils to read and write should be fined, it said.
Beaumont Crew
Loyal Soldiers

MailOnline - report
Will a young person having neither skills nor qualification have a career, or the possibility of one?  What is the role of the council in providing said skills and qualifications?
 
Diverse voicesDiverse Voices, based in Blackhorse Lane, Walthamstow, has only been in existence since 2009 but already has plans to set up a drama school in central London and is about to launch a dance school nearer to home as it tries to help young people avoid becoming victims of gang culture.
NutshellWalthamstow organisation to provide alternative education for marginalised youth
6th June 2013
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A performing arts organisation wants to provide an ‘alternative education’ for marginalised young people in Waltham Forest.
Diverse Voices, based in Blackhorse Lane, Walthamstow, has only been in existence since 2009 but already has plans to set up a drama school in central London and is about to launch a dance school nearer to home as it tries to help young people avoid becoming victims of gang culture.
The community interest company was co-founded by actor Dwayne Gumbs, and started as an organisation which tackles issues young people encounter every day through the medium of performing arts.
The 28-year-old said: “Acting out issues teenagers are likely to come across in their lives, like gang crime and other confrontations, helps them know what to do when they’re in that kind of situation.
“It’s a rehearsal for real life. It’s drama therapy really because it helps them act out their emotions in those situations.”
Now the organisation helps around 5,000 young people aged seven to 18 each year in Waltham Forest and neighbouring boroughs, visiting schools to tackle issues like racism and homophobia through plays and encouraging children to develop their own talents.
It is the latter aim Mr Gumbs hopes to achieve through the organisation’s new dance school, launching on June 21 in Landmark House, Blackhorse Lane, and the proposed drama school in London’s Carnaby Street.
The group is hoping funding will be secured through Each One Teach One, rapper Plan B’s initiative which funds various charities and organisations to create a ‘university of alternative learning’, a concept Mr Gumbs supports.
He said: “It’s definitely going to go ahead this year, we’re just waiting to see if they can provide the money.
“Learning doesn’t have to stop because they’re not going to school. The performing arts helps a lot of young people who don’t get on well in conventional education.
“We want to offer young people accreditations in the arts and help them at the start of their careers.”
Diverse Voices has linked up with Leytonstone-based organisation Box4Life to help 15 young people put on a play next week about street crime, with details to be released.
If you wish to join the dance school please visit http://www.diversevoices.co.uk to contact the group.

 
Black youthJohn Pitts, in his Reluctant Gangsters Report, 2007 said that gang -affected families felt that their concerns were not represented, nor their predicament understood by politicians and policy makers.
"As far as they are concerned we don’t exist, and even if we do, we are just some kind of problem that won’t go away. I sometimes think the best thing we could do would be to go out and vote and demand that our politicians listen to what’s happening to us." - Reluctant gangsters, John Pitts, 2007 .

 
Comment on literacy
"Low levels of literacy, and education in general, can impede the economic development of a country in the current rapidly changing, technology-driven world."
World Factbook
 
Androulla Vassiliou, Commissioner for Education, Culture, Multilingualism and Youth Androulla Vassiliou, Commissioner for Education, Culture, Multilingualism and Youth
September 2011 - "I want to encourage reading in school, at home, on buses, on trains, in the street. We need to address illiteracy wherever and in whatever form it occurs to give young people a better future." Regarding youth and training, she went on to say: “I believe all of us would prefer to fly in an aeroplane with a well-trained pilot rather than a well-educated pilot. Our objective is to achieve the right blend of education and training to suit the vocational world. Investing in vocational education and training is also one of the best ways of combating youth unemployment.” more ...
EC November 2012 - "Rethinking education is not just of question of money: whilst it is true that we need to invest more in education and training, it is clear that education systems also need to modernise and be more flexible in how they operate to respond to the real needs of today's society. Europe will only resume sustained growth by producing highly skilled and versatile people who can contribute to innovation and entrepreneurship. Efficient and well-targeted investment is fundamental to this, but we will not achieve our objectives by reducing education budgets." more ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

213.Simon
17th January 2014
Having worked in a care home housing young offenders I have very strong views on this. Education alone wont help rehabiliate young offenders they need a style boot camp to be taught discipline but also need to learn skills they can take into the real world so learning a trade would be the best way to reduce reoffending rates and give them a sense of self worth!

135. TheTruth
17th January 2014
I have worked as a teacher in a young offenders institution. The sad reality is that those who actually want to get on are vastly outnumbered by those that have no interest in learning and so disrupt lessons continually in order to be removed from the classroom back to their cell with their TV waiting. The following morning, the teacher is again faced with the same prisoner, only more angry.

88.Rambling Roy Rumple
17th January 2014
My first job as a teacher was in an approved school, providing full education and/or trade training. These were abolished due to high offending rates! Admission and release did not relate to term times, and when they were released part-way through a term reintegrating into school was problematic. Support to reintegrate are as important and effective as qualifications and skills learned in custody.
Comment
John J C Moss says...
12:21pm Fri 22 Mar 13
I see no reason why those who have not taken up a job after 6 months on benefits should not be asked to do 2 or 3 days a week of work, unpaid, to give them work experience and help them find work.
Ideally, the Council would organise this, with claimants sweeping streets (under supervision of existing street sweepers), picking litter and tidying vegetation in parks (under supervision of existing park wardens) or helping out, say, on the council switchboard, (under supervision of the existing switchboard operators).
We get "more services", claimants get work experience, existing Council employees get higher level experience supervising and managing the claimants and it all costs nothing.
What's not to like?
Cllr John Moss
Larkswood ward.
Comment
leyton_man says...
10:55am Thu 21 Mar 13
From what I have observed, MP Stella Creasy excels in the safe topics, we can all agree that loan companies and oppression of women are bad things.
However, she seems particularly silent on areas such as the downward spiral of her own back yard. Congestion, stabbings, lack of local amenities, closure of Police and Fire stations, there are others of course.
Regardless of personal opinions of Frankie, it's always a good thing to question MPs.”
CEE or Central and Eastern Europe is a term describing former communist states in Europe, after the collapse of the Iron Curtain in 1989–90.